Book


Book
Books were both scarce and expensive items before Gutenberg invented printing with movable type in the late 15c. The number of copies of any text was always necessarily small. Before Gutenberg everything had to be written, the only means of reproducing being hands and pens. Men went to great lengths to acquire books: Benedict Biscop (d. c.690) travelled to Rome, much of the journey on foot, at least four times, returning on each occasion with books and relics. By the end of the 12c, the Benedictine monastery at Canterbury had a famous collection of 600 volumes. The *codex form required the skins of many animals, usually sheep, to use as folios, i.e. the pages. This was a principal item of cost. By the 14c there were professional copyists and illuminators, e.g. Luttrell Psalter. [< OldEngl. boc = something written, a charter, record]

Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases. .

Synonyms:
, / (of a written work),


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Book — (b[oo^]k), n. [OE. book, bok, AS. b[=o]c; akin to Goth. b[=o]ka a letter, in pl. book, writing, Icel. b[=o]k, Sw. bok, Dan. bog, OS. b[=o]k, D. boek, OHG. puoh, G. buch; and fr. AS. b[=o]c, b[=e]ce, beech; because the ancient Saxons and Germans… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Book — Book, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Booked} (b[oo^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Booking}.] 1. To enter, write, or register in a book or list. [1913 Webster] Let it be booked with the rest of this day s deeds. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To enter the name of (any… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Book — A book is a set or collection of written, printed, illustrated, or blank sheets, made of paper, parchment, or other material, usually fastened together to hinge at one side. A single sheet within a book is called a leaf, and each side of a leaf… …   Wikipedia

  • book — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English bōc; akin to Old High German buoh book, Gothic boka letter Date: before 12th century 1. a. a set of written sheets of skin or paper or tablets of wood or ivory b. a set of written, printed, or… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • book — See: CLOSED BOOK, CLOSE THE BOOKS, HIT THE BOOKS, KEEP BOOKS, NOSE IN A BOOK, ONE FOR THE BOOKS, READ ONE LIKE A BOOK, TALKING BOOK, THROW THE BOOK AT …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • book — See: CLOSED BOOK, CLOSE THE BOOKS, HIT THE BOOKS, KEEP BOOKS, NOSE IN A BOOK, ONE FOR THE BOOKS, READ ONE LIKE A BOOK, TALKING BOOK, THROW THE BOOK AT …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • book — Bell Bell, n. [AS. belle, fr. bellan to bellow. See {Bellow}.] 1. A hollow metallic vessel, usually shaped somewhat like a cup with a flaring mouth, containing a clapper or tongue, and giving forth a ringing sound on being struck. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • book — Rhapsody Rhap so*dy, n.; pl. {Rhapsodies}. [F. rhapsodie, L. rhapsodia, Gr. rapsw,di a, fr. rapsw,do s a rhapsodist; ra ptein to sew, stitch together, unite + w,dh a song. See {Ode}.] 1. A recitation or song of a rhapsodist; a portion of an epic… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Book account — Book Book (b[oo^]k), n. [OE. book, bok, AS. b[=o]c; akin to Goth. b[=o]ka a letter, in pl. book, writing, Icel. b[=o]k, Sw. bok, Dan. bog, OS. b[=o]k, D. boek, OHG. puoh, G. buch; and fr. AS. b[=o]c, b[=e]ce, beech; because the ancient Saxons and …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Book debt — Book Book (b[oo^]k), n. [OE. book, bok, AS. b[=o]c; akin to Goth. b[=o]ka a letter, in pl. book, writing, Icel. b[=o]k, Sw. bok, Dan. bog, OS. b[=o]k, D. boek, OHG. puoh, G. buch; and fr. AS. b[=o]c, b[=e]ce, beech; because the ancient Saxons and …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Book learning — Book Book (b[oo^]k), n. [OE. book, bok, AS. b[=o]c; akin to Goth. b[=o]ka a letter, in pl. book, writing, Icel. b[=o]k, Sw. bok, Dan. bog, OS. b[=o]k, D. boek, OHG. puoh, G. buch; and fr. AS. b[=o]c, b[=e]ce, beech; because the ancient Saxons and …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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